The Musicality Of Video Games

Hey, hey!

I would like to welcome you back to one of my Digital Artefacts for this semester, you can read the Pitch for this project here. 

I have been creating written content around the idea of Video Game Sound Design, and following feedback given to me have adjusted my work. A comment given to me was my lack of in depth scholarly research which altered the way I wished to go about this project. 

Initially, I aimed to just look into certain games and their soundtracks and write about them. While that is still very much a working construct, I have been working on the history and importance of this in individual posts to be more informative and educated rather than broadly exploring. 

After it being a suggestion I have also started to consider the framework of nostalgia to align this project with, as pointed out holds a mass amount of weight on how we transcribe and associate with sound design. I have found that using the formal elements to critique a game’s perspective around score to be an interesting contributor to really understanding the importance of sound.  

A source relied to me in feedback allowed me to make this project more personal and take a dive into the effect of soundtracks on myself too. I have shared personal favourite ambient game based videos which I listen to outside of the game space and why, my feelings and uses of them. 

For further information please check out the video. 

References

Extraverts, E. I. N. (n.d.). A thesis presented to. Gatech.Edu. Retrieved October 7, 2021, from https://smartech.gatech.edu/bitstream/handle/1853/54462/LEVY-THESIS-2015.pdf

Klimmt, C., Possler, D., May, N., Auge, H., Wanjek, L., & Wolf, A.-L. (2019). Effects of soundtrack music on the video game experience. Media Psychology22(5), 689–713.

Roberts, R. (2014). Fear of the unknown: Music and sound design in psychological horror games. In Music In Video Games (pp. 152–164). Routledge.

Tierney, J. (2013, July 8). What is nostalgia good for? Quite a bit, research shows. The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/09/science/what-is-nostalgia-good-for-quite-a-bit-research-shows.html

3 Comments

  1. Hi Taylor, I really like your digital artefact.

    You have chosen a fascinating topic and I am particularly drawn to the nostalgia of videogame music. In comparison to your pitch, your beta has great resources that explore the effect of sound. Your decision to narrow down your focus will help your final analysis become more concise.

    I really enjoy your video aesthetics, from the audio to the imagery, your videos truly evoke nostalgia. I am interested in how to plan to complete your final submission for DA, i.e., timelines and schedules.

    I have nothing to say, other than your DA idea is great! Gook luck with your DA.

    Like

  2. Taylor I love your DA, I’ve been hooked from the start. Audio in gaming is such a massive component. Your DA is quite similar to my own as audio brings up so much emotion when playing games. I love listening to audio you’ve shared, it’s so nostalgic! I’d suggest looking at songs on spotify and SoundCloud, many artists incorporate old audio form games to create nostalgic songs, it is so cool. overall great beta, keep up the great work. Almost at the finish line!

    Like

  3. Hey Taylor, once again, great job with the aesthetics for your blog post and overall design and niche area of gaming you have found. Music really is some of the most important things in games and movies, signifying important moments and giving out vibes. Nostalgia is so helpful as a framework and I am pretty sure from my last comment I said that I get so much nostalgia from hearing old songs from previous FIFA games on the radio or something. So I love that you have narrowed down on that aspect of music for your analytical framework.
    Very, very good article this one: https://theface.com/music/best-fifa-game-songs-football-soundtrack-22

    Like

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