Movies That Left Core Memories So Bad That They’ve Replaced The Sad Ones

Hey, Hello, Hi, 

I want to simply brush over the fact that I haven’t written or posted anything since, I believe, February. There are many reasons, all of them dull and boring, but I think I’m back to possible frequent uploads. Thus, while a music piece is in the works, here is a list, in no particular order, of films that have left a lasting impact. 

I would be lying if I didn’t say this post wasn’t inspired by my lovely friend, Ty, who you should be reading from and posts way more than me too. Anyway, as they said, I’m no film degree nerd with any true stance to be able to comment like one, but alas I will. 

1. Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe 

2005, Director: Andrew Adamson

I feel like, for many of my generation, this one speaks for itself. However, while I loved fantasy films and novels like Eragon, C.S Lewis’s Chronicles of Narnia truly never left my head. Like ever. So much so that I freak out when I realise how old this movie and I are. You’re telling me it’s nearly been 20 years and I still think about this all the time? I remember as a kid I was so upset that the wolves were always displayed as evil in these films, which I still stand by fully, however that scene of them in the ice castle when Edmund betrays his family? Rent Free. 

2. Whiplash

2014, Director: Damien Chazelle

This film makes me sound like an obnoxious film guy at university who doesn’t really understand the complexities of it, but I like to believe I’m not like them. Miles Teller is a chef’s kiss, and considering the most recent release of Top Gun: Maverick, this is the perfect time to talk about the absolutely brilliant performance from him and his co-star J.K Simmons, who truly made me fear potential mentors/teachers. Now, I’ve heard people say this movie is boring, which I highly disagree with. Nonetheless, I understand it is the type of thing you need an attention span for to really grasp it.  

3. The Spectacular Now

2013, Director: James Ponsoldt

I am a Miles Teller girlie, through and through, since this movie and the Divergent adaptations. I believe I even forced my last partner to watch this movie with me, and couldn’t shut up during it. It is so much more than a silly love story, and to be fair one of my favourite aspects is the real depiction of mental health through a teenage boy. Yeah, Perks of Being a Wallflower is there and should be on this list in a way, but The Spectacular Now is so vastly different to it and just as important. Relationships don’t cure mental issues as much as we want them to. 

4. Coraline

2009, Director: Henry Selick

This is usually what I say when people ask what my favourite movie is and that still highly stands. I adore Coraline so much, and I’m the kind of friend who bullies you for a) not having seen it or b) were scared of it as a child. I never was, yes it’s a flex, and I even analysed it this past semester for a monster media class. 

5. Pride and Prejudice

2005, Director: Joe Wright

Oh, the love, the adoration, I have for this movie. It is truly just so magical, so outstandingly beautiful. The score, the cinematography, the casting – I mean Kiera Knightly was one thousand percent part of my sexual awakening. This film is a core memory, the essence, the atmosphere, all of it holds weight in my heart. 

6. The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones

2013, Director: Harald Zwart

Did I at the time hate this adaptation? Yes. Was I super hopeful for the show version but then dramatically betrayed, and even see myself as a victim of that show? Yes. Now, despite all that I still had it as a guilty pleasure film. Little Taylorlani would stay up late reading with it on in the background and would first try to dabble in realism portraiture trying to draw Jamie’s Jace. It was horrible, I was like 11. 

7. The Hunger Games

2012, Director: Gary Ross

Is there a running theme of 2000s novel adaptations on this list? Of course, I am nothing but a little book nerd. City of Bones is a guilty pleasure, but with The Hunger Games, there is not a single ounce of guilt. I could write essays upon essays about the book and the movie. I rewatch the whole series at least three times at minimum a year and own multiple copies of the books. I am convinced anyone who never liked it, or was team Gale, just never understood. 

8. The Crow

1994, Director: Alex Proyas

Ugh, this movie. I heard there might be a remake? I don’t want it and I don’t think anyone should. Brendon Lee’s depiction of Eric is unmatched, it is beautiful, and it is tragic the way his life ended from it. I was raised on this movie, my dad owns this doll-sized figurine of Eric and as a kid, I threw fits because he would not let me play with it. If you haven’t seen this at least once in your life, please do. 

9. Scream

1996, Director: Wes Craven

Okay, so this is not a surprise. This is deeply loved, and I am another one of those lovers. I arguably watched it way too young and was actually scared of Ghost Face when I was little, though that has done a complete switch up now. This movie was important to a loved one who passed away, which is a sad, but beautiful way of keeping their spirit alive. 

10. Love, Rosie

2014, Director: Christian Ditter

Lily Collins is another common feature on this list, and truly I do love her. This movie encapsulates the mundane, the normalities, and the complexities of human relationships, ageing, and love. It is rich and warm in emotion. Comfort movie, and living in my head. Oh, for that love.

11. X-Men: First Class

2011, Director: Matthew Vaughn

I am completely a comic girlie at heart, although I am not an MCU one to be fair. I don’t hate it, it’s really not that deep, I just view comic adaptations the same as book ones and a lot of them leave me disappointed. First Class though? Adore it. Yeah, Wolverine isn’t in it (besides that small cameo), but that’s kind of why I love it so much.  

12. Man of Steel

2013, Director: Zack Snyder

Again, comics, my heart, although yet again I am not really a DCEU girlie. The same reason as above, but I do read more DC comics. Man of Steel was one of the first comic films I fell in love with, outside of my Spider-man obsession. To be fair, I can’t tell you why besides the atmosphere, the depth, and the way it actually made me cry. Man of Steel set up something that sadly couldn’t be topped by the follow-ups for that era. In my opinion anyway.

13. Into the Spiderverse

2018, Directors: Peter Ramsey, Bob Persichetti, Rodney Rothman

I mentioned the Spider-man obsession, it’s intense. My father would tell you he hates Spider-man because of me, for every time I was around when I was young I would be binge-watching them. I saw Toby’s third movie in the cinema, yes it was 2007, and yes I was 5 years old. Now, as someone who is biracial, Into the Spiderverse and just Miles as a comic character, is something I am emotionally attached to. I will always feel more in tune with him than Peter, but I am typing this as I have a Peter Spider-man blanket on my bed. Yes, I am 20. 

14. The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

2012, Director: Peter Jackson

I remember when I was in year seven we had to read The Hobbit, at that time I didn’t want to, not because I hated it but because I was deep in my YA fantasy/dystopia 2010’s era and my interests laid elsewhere. Because of this, I watched the film, however, it was at that moment I fell in love with the movie and also realised that the book was being broken into different parts and had to read it for class anyway. 

15. Fantastic Mr Fox

2009, Director: Wes Anderson

Finishing off this list with an animation masterpiece, though there are plenty of more movies I can mention. I wholeheartedly cherish this movie. It’s pretty, it’s coloured like my soul, and so comforting that many of the scenes are core memories. It just makes me happy, which is something I can say for everything on this list which is ultimately the most important thing to me. 

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